The village of Kizhoor has not yet achieved fame

In the Kizhoor village of the Union Territory, Kizhoor, a tiny village in the Mangalam constituency, has yet to receivethe credit it deserves for hosting a peaceful referendum that finally resulted in Puducherry’s emancipation from French rule and its merger with India.

Following India’s independence in 1947, the French planned to release Puducherry from their rule, but it wasn’t until the historic referendum conducted at Kizhoor on October 18, 1954 that they agreed to cede control of four territories—Puducherry, Karaikal, Yanam, and Mahe—to India. The lands of French India were de facto transferred to India on November 1 as a result of the vote.

Kizhoor village

Following the French government’s approval of the Treaty of Cession by its Parliament, the House of Representatives and Municipal Councils’ majority decision resulted in the definitive transfer of control of the four territories to the Indian government on August 16, 1962.

The Puducherry administration chose to observe August 16 as De jure Transfer Day each year in light of the significance of the date in the years after Independence. 

Where the legislators in Kizhoor decided to join with the Indian State, a little shack now stands as a reminder. There is a closed area inside the shed that contains some significant images of key figures, including the nation’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, who participated in the activities leading up to the liberation of Puducherry. Along with the shed, a pole that will be used to raise the flag on August 16 and a plaque with the names of those who took part in the referendum are there. 

The village of Kizhoor has not yet gained its importance

Kizhoor village

Kizhoor, a small town in the Mangalam constituency, has not yet achieved significance in Union Territory issues despite hosting the calm referendum that led to Puducherry’s freedom from French rule and its merger with India.

Despite their decision to release Puducherry from their administration following India’s independence in 1947, the French ultimately elected to cede control of four territories—Puducherry, Karaikal, Yanam, and Mahe—to India after the historic vote in Kizhoor on October 18, 1954.

Following the election on November 1, India effectively gained control of the former French Indian provinces.

After the French government had approved the Assignment Treaty through its parliament, the definitive transfer of power of the four territories to the Indian government took place on August 16, 1962, thanks to the majority decision of the House of Representatives and local councils taking part in the referendum.

The Puducherry administration decided to observe August 16 as a de jure transfer day every year because of the significance of this day following independence.

The location in Kizhoor where MPs decided to join with the Indian state is commemorated with a modest hut.

A closed room located inside the shed is home to several significant images of notable figures, including the nation’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, who attended the activities leading up to the independence of Puducherry.

The Path  to Freedom: Important Stops

The referendum, the outcome of which was decided by a majority vote in the House of Representatives and Municipal Councils, opened the way for India’s official transfer of sovereignty on August 16, 1962. Following the French Parliament’s ratification of the Treaty of Cession, this crucial event occurred.

Kizhoor’s Forgotten Heritage: A Cry for Recognition

Kizhoor’s Forgotten Heritage: A Cry for Recognition

On November 1 and August 16, the Kizhoor ghost only rises twice a year. The museum is only open to visitors twice a year, the rest of the time fading away into oblivion. Despite promises from various governments to establish Kizhoor as a monument in the Union Territory, only an asbestos shed has been built. Unfortunately, there hasn’t been a concerted effort to introduce the younger population of the Union Territory to this site of historical significance.

Voices of Kizhoor: Advocating for Recognition

A Kizhoor citizen named S. Ravichandran bemoaned this negligence and emphasized that Kizhoor needs recognition just as much as Puducherry does. He questioned why Kizhoor, which was crucial to the history of the UT, is still unknown.

These opinions are shared by well-known economist and politician M. Ramadass, who notes that the government has not given Kizhoor the attention it deserves given its famous historical significance. He pointed out that the memorial was in such bad shape that it was practically vacant and no longer recognizable as a location of monumental significance—even the Chief Minister was not present at the site on this important day.

Reviving Kizhoor’s Legacy

The historical monument in Kizhoor has to be renovated, and it might even offer weekend sound and light shows to draw visitors. According to Ramalingam, Kizhoor is the ideal location for village tourism, and the tourism office would arrange transportation for visitors coming from the town.

Kizhoor village: A Vision for Development

Ramadass advises that the Sivaranthagam panchayat be turned into a model village by utilizing the advantages of Central and State government initiatives, which emphasizes the significance of Kizhoor’s growth even more. This bold strategy, analogous to the Kundrakudi experiment, might put the community on the map and highlight its progress. Freedom involves more than just removing restrictions; it also involves fostering the ambitions of a population. In this light, Kizhoor, the center of Puducherry’s independence, ought to be pleased to display its upward trajectory.

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